Mitch Barrie via (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/) Flickr

The Nevada based 3-D printing company, Polymer 80, is suing the state over its new ban on so-called “ghost guns.”

Nevada Governor Stephen Sisolak, a Democrat, signed Nevada state assembly bill 286. This bill banned all unserialized/self-manufactured guns in the state. All firearms that fell under this category are now subject to seizure.

It was then that Polymer 80 comes into play. The company makes and sells 80% products as well as complete serialized products. P80 had to file emergency legal action to stay in business, many of their products fall under the ban and this legislation would effectively bring their business to a halt.

From Guns.com:

“Polymer80 was forced to take this extraordinary action because, among many other reasons, AB 286, which was hastily and improvidently written and enacted, purports to curtail and criminalize products that are legal to own under federal law, and it does so through vague and unintelligible proscriptions,” notes the company. “At its core, AB 286 strips lawful citizens of Nevada of their basic, constitutionally protected rights, and targets corporations, such as Polymer80, for lawful activities that greatly contribute to the Nevada economy and support the rights of Nevadans.”

A hearing on the temporary restraining order is set for July 14 before Lyon County District Judge John P. Schlegelmilch.

The case by P80 is not the only litigation taking aim at AB 286. The Firearms Policy Coalition, along with two individuals, has also filed for a preliminary injunction against state officials in the U.S. District Court for Nevada, pending a trial challenging the new law.

“Nevada’s broad ban on the possession and construction of constitutionally protected firearms and precursor materials violates Nevadans’ Second Amendment rights and unlawfully deprives them of their property, in violation of the Constitution,” said Adam Kraut, FPC’s senior director of legal operations. “In order for a law-abiding individual to exercise their Second Amendment rights, they must have the ability to possess firearms, including those they build themselves. As our complaint explains, the right to self-build one’s own arms has been enjoyed, and at times absolutely necessary, since the founding of our country. We will aggressively litigate this action and seek an injunction to prevent this law from depriving individuals of their rights and property.”

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Gene Ralno
Gene Ralno
2 months ago

This nation has 50 states, at least 30 of which despise this kind of nonsense. I’d recommend P80 move its inventory to west Texas, perhaps El Paso, and market existing products from there until this oppression is erased. Taxes are about the same and who knows, manufacturing in a friendlier state might generate unexpected profits.

Keith Clark
Keith Clark
2 months ago
Reply to  Gene Ralno

Yup.

Ol'Sarge
Ol'Sarge
2 months ago
Reply to  Gene Ralno

Texas is too volatile politically and on the verge of flipping! If I’m moving an industry I’m picking someplace safer in the future. Some states actually have laws on the books protecting firearms and ammo and home manufacture. And that number is growing.

Keith Clark
Keith Clark
2 months ago

Let me guess? Democrat Governor?

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